For a limited time — exhibits on Cathedral campus celebrate façade dedication

Curated by Father Jordan Hainsey

In celebration of the dedication of St. Mary’s Cathedral Basilica façade on Sunday, June 6, two temporary exhibits entitled “Speaking for Centuries” and “Maes: The Builder” will open on the Cathedral campus and remain on view through June 30. Additionally, following the façade dedication Stephen Enzweiler, Cathedral historian, will lead a guided tour of the Cathedral including the newly added statues and tympana.

“Speaking for Centuries” — St. Mary’s Park
A series of images and accompanying narrative will transform St. Mary’s Park into an outdoor gallery where visitors can journey through the construction of the Cathedral Basilica.

Using archival photos in vivid detail, visitors will be able to see the original 1845 Cathedral, the building process of the 1894 Cathedral and façade begun by Bishop Camillus Paul Maes, and the 1901 Cathedral interior.

Visitors will also be able to learn about the impetus for the completion of the façade by Bishop Roger J. Foys and the 24 statues and two tympana that now grace the exterior. A series of images will highlight the design phase and work of the new statues and tympana by Cathedral façade statuary artist Neilson Carlin. From gestural drawings, to sketches, to the clay model, and finally stone, visitors will be able to explore the artist’s creative process from start to finish.

Self-guide tour. St. Mary’s Park is located on Madison Ave., Covington, across the street from the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption and is open dawn to dusk.

“Maes: The Builder” — Cathedral Basilica
Displayed at the Maes Chapel inside the Cathedral Basilica, visitors will be able to view a collection of personal effects that belonged to Bishop Camillus Paul Maes.

From vesture, to his pectoral cross, ring and eye glasses, the awe-inspiring display will work to bring the cathedral visionary to life.

Visitors may also view the trowel used at the Cathedral’s cornerstone laying ceremony in 1910, and the formal wear of the young trainbearer to Bishop Maes worn during liturgical ceremonies.

For Cathedral hours and liturgy times, visit: covcathedral.com.